My Mom's 1986 Ford Crown Victoria

XLTbeater

Member
It was part of the instructions that came with the mass air conversion kit.

On a related note; I need to take some time to siphon out the gas I put in last year and replace it with fresh stuff.
 
Last edited:

XLTbeater

Member
So my Grand Marquis exhaust project is taking a lot longer than intended. The exhaust studs are mostly frozen on the 4.6L. I had the passenger side broken free and am now working on the driver side. For whatever reason, the driver side studs are in worse shape than the passenger side. And the studs that I thought would be the easy ones; are the most stubborn. I rounded off 2 nuts on the driver studs and had to call it quits until I got the special sockets for removing rounded nuts. Also got a 300psi impact ratchet; as my 145psi impact ratchet wasn't hitting that hard.

I might take a hiatus from this until Labor Day; and start focusing on the Crown Vic. I still need to reinstall the repaired ECM and siphon out as much fuel as I can from the tank before I make another 1st fire attempt.
 

XLTbeater

Member
Yah, I was told that by a couple of my friends. Just pour a bottle of fuel stabilizer and run it. I might siphon it out, mix stabilizer with the remaining gas, and top it off with fresh 93. I will run the year old gas in my Grand Marquis because it doesn't seem to care anyways.
 

XLTbeater

Member
Whilst working from home yesterday, I got the 30A circuit breaker that I had been meaning to install in the Crown Vic; and glued a divider between the 2 poles. I probably could have left it undivided; but the factory circuit breaker had a divider; so I am doing likewise. This will be one of those items to be replaced whenever the weather breaks.

IMG_1737.JPG

IMG_1738.JPG

IMG_1128.JPG
 

XLTbeater

Member
Got nothing done to any of the vehicles; just little things. A couple weeks ago, we finally took delivery of our washing machine after 2.5 months of waiting. The people who were sent to take the old machine out and install the new one consisted of a guy with a hernia and his teenage son; who was (described to me) all of maybe 120lbs. They got the old machine out; but left the new machine in the middle of the floor. The guy was in pain when he got there and after taking out the old washer and bringing in the new machine, he didn't want to deal with old plumbing; so he left and said to get a plumber to install. So I spent that weekend installing the washing machine.

This past weekend, I did some cooking for a friend's son's graduation party. Since he had COVID at graduation; this was his rain date. Came back from that and started messing with the plumbing for the washing machine. That part of the basement has ancient plumbing that my Dad never got to replumb. So I am going to brace that all up; and start replacing all the valves leading up the washing machine; and also replace the hoses for that machine. Hopefully that will stop the dripping from the joints.

On a car-related note; during that process, I found a piece of the OE battery-to-engine ground cable for the Crown Vic. It was among some other bits in a box that I saved for whatever reasons. Thinking that it's 6AWG. Probably good brand new. When I cut it out; I decided that I needed to go with a much larger 1/0AWG cable with the new setup.

IMG_1743.JPG

IMG_1744.JPG

IMG_1128.JPG
 

XLTbeater

Member
I managed to do a couple things for the Crown Vic over the weekend. I installed the circuit breaker for the power accessories (that rusty box on the starter solenoid) and reinstalled the Quarterhorse back into the ECU. Not much, but something. I still need to siphon out the old gas, reinstall the ECU, and lube the cylinders before I attempt another 1st start. That might be a few weeks from now; as I want to focus on installing the exhaust on my Merc.

Other than that, I spent the rest of the weekend replacing some of the plumbing in the basement; and bracing some of the old plumbing that's left so I can take it apart. Fun stuff!

IMG_1749.JPG

IMG_1750.JPG
 

XLTbeater

Member
I'm just trying to get it like you guys got it. If I had a fraction of the skills that I have seen on this forum; this car would have been completed long ago.
 

XLTbeater

Member
I know this is not the Crown Vic; but it is kind of the same thing; just a bit younger. Today I managed to remove 9 of the 16 exhaust manifold studs (actually 4 of the nuts backed off) on my '05 Grand Marquis; and loosened another 2 underneath the passenger side exhaust manifold. I will move the a/c compressor out of the way to get at the other 2 studs. I ran back into the problem that I had the last time I attempted to remove the exhaust studs; the 2 that I rounded off. I will come back at them tomorrow with the rounded nut remover socket. I hope that works as I am almost done removing the exhaust manifolds. I am trying to figure why my 200psi compressor will only go to 150psi. Not too much of a problem; but for those 3 stubborn studs, I would like to hit them a little harder. Otherwise, 145psi - 150psi was doing the trick with the other studs.

IMG_1761.JPG

IMG_1762.JPG
 

XLTbeater

Member
The Grand Marquis exhaust project is dead in the water. I got 15 of the 16 studs and nuts loosened. One of the rounded nuts reamed itself out when I used the rounded-nut remover socket on it. At this point, I will have to get a nut welded onto the end of that stud and remove the stud itself. I smeared Never-Seize on all of the studs and bolts that were removed before buttoning it all back up. I will confirm with the mechanic in the next town over if he wants to take a stab at removing that one stud. So, it's back to working on the Crown Vic and the house. Bright side of this is I didn't break any studs and I can still drive the car until I can have it worked on.
 

FMOS Racing

PSI=:-D
I Support the NLOC
Those things look really painful to remove! 15 of 16 sounds like a pretty decent success rate, though I know that last one was crucial.
 

XLTbeater

Member
Those were the studs on the top of the manifolds. I didn't get pics of the bottom studs. Those were nastier. 14 of those studs came out; just took a little time with the air ratchet. The other stud with the rounded-nut had to be removed with my electric impact. I was able to get a 1/2" swivel extension in there and get that one out. The stud next to it with the nut that reamed itself out; was only accessible with the air ratchet. If I could have gotten the electric impact gun in there; I might have gotten that out before it reamed itself.

I believe my success is partly due to soaking everything repeatedly for a year. Moving forward; When I remove an exhaust manifold stud/bolt; I will smear Never-Seize on it and torque it back in; then move to the next stud/bolt. I'm thinking that as I loosened all of the studs; the exhaust manifold moved out a little and put more pressure on the remaining studs. Maybe that contributed to the difficulty on that 1 stud. Lesson learned - the hard way.
 
Top